Fit for duty

Shirtmaking is something we’ve been doing for quite a while, the subtlety in their design goes way beyond the pattern of the fabric. Pocket no pocket, cuffs that fold back, roll up, button, the fabric itself cotton, linen, Tencel, a blend and then there is the collar. French, button down, rounded to name but a few.

Our latest range, as usual, has changes in each of these factors. The cut itself is closer to the body, and trimmed to be worn by the trim, lean and muscular among you. The new Extra Slim Fit is closer fitting to the body through chest and waist and also on the bicep. To maintain comfort, we’ve used a polyamide which is hard wearing but smooth to the touch and has stretch to contour the body and allow for ease of movement.

The new Extra Slim Fit is closer fitting to the body through chest and waist and also on the bicep. To maintain comfort, we’ve used a polyamide which is hard wearing but smooth to the touch and has stretch to contour the body and allow for ease of movement.

Originally, shirts for the masses would have been collarless purely because of ease of make and as the shirt itself would not have been washed after each wear. A man would have more collars and cuffs than shirts themselves and they would be washed more regularly.

In the 1930’s, washing machines became commonplace in the average home and the trend for separate collars and cuffs dwindled. Trends are cyclical and today, Winchester shirts are seen as a status symbol; some style coaches claim they shouldn’t be worn by anyone under 25 as they cannot possibly have achieved the success required to wear one! Utter nonsense I say and I’m sure Tommy Shelby would agree.

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